Saturday, December 5, 2009

How the Soviets dealt with their enemies...

How the Soviets dealt with their enemies...

"One night in the winter of 1934 Marshal Voroshilov (Soviet Chief of State) was seated on my right and Marshall Budenny on my left. They had drunk a bit of vodka and both were relaxed and gay. 'You know, Bullitt,' said Voroshilov, 'Budenny is the man who won the civil war without ever knowing what he was fighting about.' 'That’s true, my motto is not proletarians of the world unite’, but cavalrymen of the world unite. I don’t care why I fight so long as I have a good war.' We laughed, and Voroshilov then said, ‘I think the most extraordinary thing we ever did together was to capture Kiev without fighting.'

'There were 11,000 Czarist officers with their wives and children in Kiev, and they had more troops than we had. We never could have captured the city with fighting, so we used propaganda and told them that they would be released and allowed to go to their homes with their families and treated as well as possible. They believed us and surrendered. Then we shot all the men and boys and put all the women and girls into brothels for our army. My army needed women, and I was concerned with my army’s health and not with the health of those women; and it didn’t make any difference anyhow, because they were all dead within 3 months.'

Testimony of William C. Bullitt, US Ambassador to Soviet
Union, 1933-36, House Report 2189, Committee on Un-American Activities1